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Dr. Steve Glykys

Engineering and Construction – Mediator, Adjudicator, Arbitrator.

Dr. Steve Glykys is a practising full-time commercial Mediator, Adjudicator and Arbitrator (accredited by the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators in UK and a Corporate Panel Member of the Dispute Board Federation (Switzerland)) as well as a registered professional member (ICC International Court, GCC Commercial Arbitration Centre, Bahrain BCDR-AAA and many others) with over 25 years of engineering and construction experience (18 years in GCC countries) he has an impeccable track record of resolving disputes and achieving successful outcomes.

He can serve as a Party-appointed Adjudicator or Arbitrator (Sole, Panel Member or Chairman),Advocate or Expert Witness, accredited to work in any jurisdictions in different parts of the world under any Institutional, Ad Hoc (ICC, AAA, LCIA, UNCITRAL) or Party-appointed Rules.  He is also qualified as Expert Witness (registered with GCC Commercial Arbitration Centre) and also as an Adjudicator member of DAB (‘Dispute Adjudication’) or DRB (‘Dispute Resolution’) boards.

How does the Law Protect the Interest of Occupiers who are not Privy to Contracts between the Employer and Contractors?

LLM Dissertation paper: April 2012, Aberdeen Business School, Construction Law and Arbitration


Large project construction contracts are among the most economically significant agreements in the economy. They are distinct however to the extent that person intended to benefit from the contract, the occupier, is not part of that agreement. Construction works are agreed between head contractors and subcontractors, and the occupier is a third party to the agreement. Because of the way in which contract law has developed at common law, third parties are generally excluded from enforcing a contract, which is enforceable only between the parties themselves. This paper therefore looks at the state of the law and industry practice in three jurisdictions, England, Australia and the United Arab Emirates, and assesses the ways in which the law, and those involved in the construction industry, have created ways and means of protecting the interests of the occupier, and other interested parties not privy to the contracts.

It shows that in two ways, English law has been particularly harsh on occupiers, the law of privity of contract, and the fact that tort does not allow the recovery of pure economic loss. As such, it has had to go to further lengths to avoid the harsh application of the law. 

Denied Access to a Construction Site

White paper: January 2011, Aberdeen Business School, Construction Law and Arbitration


This papers presents the legal and contractual rights and liabilities obtaining between Employer and Contractor at common law and those arising under JCT SCB/Q 2005 as well as having regard to general principles of contract law such as that of remoteness of damage, discusses three common problems (a) whether the purchase of special equipment by the contractor, (b) the loss of another contract in lieu of securing the contracted one, and (c) the forced sale of the contractor’s  managing director house, could be regarded as ‘losses’ to be included in a claim for breach of contract instigated by the contractor against the employer.

The use of certificates between the parties and it’s implications

White paper:  January 2011, Aberdeen Business School, Construction Law and Arbitration.


This paper is based on Lord Pearson in Kaye v Hosier & Dickinson [1972] 1 W.L.R. 146. It discussed this observation generally in relation to the status of certificates (e.g. interim and final certificates) given or issued in the context of construction contracts. It also discusses the specific purpose, function, content and form of certificates given or issued in that context.

Late Interim Payments, Termination of Contract, Insolvency

Case Study: Offer of Contractual Legal Advice, December 2010, Aberdeen Business School, Construction Law and Arbitration.


This case study provided the parties with contractual advice on their rights and liabilities in their dispute circumstances (late interim payments by the employer, termination of contract by contactor and termination of contact by employer due to contractor’s  insolvency)  taking account of the provisions of the JCT Standard Form of Building Contract with Contractors Design (1998 edition), the relevant provisions of Housing Grants Construction, and Regeneration Act (HGCR) 1996 and decided judicial authorities.  advise the parties on their rights and liabilities in the circumstances.

The Local Democracy, Economic Development and Construction Act (LDEDCA) 2009

White paper:  December 2010, Aberdeen Business School, Construction Law and Arbitration.


This article gives a critical analysis of the payment provisions of the 1996 Act and the 2009 Act and determines whether the new law provides for a more effective payment mechanism. The role of ‘Pay When Certified’ clauses is discussed and the author expresses his opinion on the correctness of banning them under the 2009 Act. The discussions focused on creating an effective payment mechanism under the statute.  The payment process was one of the major areas under consideration during the reform consultation for the Housing Grants, Construction and Regeneration Act (HGCR) 1996. The reform process has given birth to The Local Democracy, Economic Development and Construction Act (LDEDCA) 2009. When the 2009 Act takes effect (probably in second quarter of 2011) it will have an important impact on payment mechanisms in construction contracts.

Delictual claims, Legal Arguments, Legal Claims, Case Law

Case Study: Offer of Contractual Legal Advice, November 2010, Aberdeen Business School, Construction Law and Arbitration.


This case study provided the parties with contractual advice on what delictual claims they could lave, arising out of a motor car / bicycle accident case, and against whom they would make such claims. Offered advice stated what evidence they would require to lead to substantiate their legal arguments, taking account of the relative weight of each piece of evidence. It also briefly commented on how successful their legal claims would be taking account of the evidence available and any counter claims or defences that may be led by the party them are claiming against. The advisors view analysed the facts in detail, gave reasons for the same and references to relevant case law and/or legislative provisions.

UK manufacturer of high-specification racing cycles -v- UK manufacturer of high-specification racing cycles

Case Study: Offer of Contractual Legal Advice, January 2010, Aberdeen Business School.


This paper analyses the facts of a particular scenario presented by the parties.  It provides ABC party with advice on the counter claims of XYZ party. It provides the author’s views (briefly) on whether a settlement offer should be made or not and what that offer might be and why it should be made. It further (through the discussion of the various points) gives a brief advice on how to tighten the terms of a contract like this in the future, to avoid a similar dispute. The advice offered takes into account the relative weight of each piece of claim / evidence identified and evaluates the likely prospect of each potential claim / evidence being successful by also considering the counter claims or defences that may be invoked by the party they are claiming against.

The Formalities of Contracts Act 2006

Case Study: Offer of Contractual Legal Advice, November 2009, Aberdeen Business School.


This paper discusses the formalities of Contracts act 2006 an Act designed to make provision to require the agreement of certain contracts within certain sectors in writing in order to improve certainty of contractual relations in those sectors.

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